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« Lifestyle changes? ORLY? | Main | The Fat Studies Reader vs. the New Yorker. (Guess Who wins?) »

July 13, 2009

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They've kind of already started this here in japan in the form of "metabo"
Here is an english article on it:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/13/world/asia/13fat.html

The school i work at recently did the metabo measurement on all employees regardless of age. A few of the male employees were over the "metabo" 33.5 inch limit and have thus been branded and teased by all female employees. One of whom is a 6 ft tall gym teacher who does nothing BUT exercise all day. At 5 ft 10 inches with a waist of 30 inches I was well under the 35 inch female limit but was consoled by my female coworkers for "being fat" (the average waist of the other female employees was around 26 inches) The female employees view metabo as a "joke" and a "good way to get back at the men".

Amen!

I am absolutely horrified by this LeanWorks program. I'm even more horrified that any company would consider implementing it. Unless my weight is pertinent to the job I'm performing, it's no ones business but mine. I'm an excellent worker. They should be looking at my job performance, not thinking, "oh, that fattie is costing us x amount of dollars" or, "Oh, she's fat, definitely not healthy." I'm more than capable of taking care of myself, thanks.

The suggestions you made are great. A long, stressful work day doesn't easily lend itself to a healthy life style. After 10 hours of work, the last thing I want to do is spend another hour cooking. And at that point exercise seems more like a chore.

It scares me sometimes how employers are more concerned with their bottom line and waistlines, rather than the overall well being of their workforce.

Similar thing with public employees here in SC (back in Feb):

SC bill would increase premiums on obese workers

Politicians are still debating this...but little discussion of whether the "facts" they are employing are accurate or not.

Linky no worky, sorry. Try again:

http://daisysdeadair.blogspot.com/2009/02/sc-bill-would-increase-premiums-on.html

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